Courtesy of Jeffrey Meldrum 3-D scans of a selection from the more than 200 footprint casts collected in the lab of Jeffrey Meldrum, rendered by the Idaho Virtualization Lab (Idaho Museum of Natural History). The size averages between 16 and 17 inches in length.

Courtesy of Jeffrey Meldrum
3-D scans of a selection from the more than 200 footprint casts collected in the lab of Jeffrey Meldrum, rendered by the Idaho Virtualization Lab (Idaho Museum of Natural History). The size averages between 16 and 17 inches in length.


Scientist to Search for Bigfoot

A scientist in Idaho wants to use a blimp to search the western United States for the mythical Bigfoot.

According to MSNBC, Jeff Meldrum, a faculty member at Idaho State University, has shaken off skeptics and won approval to seek the creature, often described as a large, hairy man-ape. Bigfoot, also known as sasquatch, has been the subject of many alleged sightings and hoaxes over the years.

Meldrum, who wrote the book “Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science,” stated the quest is a giant leap in the search for Bigfoot, whom he believes is a descendant of a large ape that was native to Asia and came to America via the Bering land bridge.

“The challenge with any animal that is rare, solitary, nocturnal and far-ranging in habitat is to find them and observe them in the wild; this technology provides for that,” he said.

Yahoo News reports, Meldrum is hoping to raise at least $300,000 in private donations to build the remote-controlled dirigible blimp, equip it with a thermal-imaging camera and send it aloft in hopes of catching an aerial glimpse of Bigfoot, also known as sasquatch.

The blimp idea originally came from William Barnes, who claims to have met Bigfoot during a 1997 camping trip. Barnes later approached Meldrum to propose it.

Scholars and skeptics claim there is no hard scientific evidence for the existence of Bigfoot.