This frame grab from video, provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) shows a test at the FAAs technical center in Atlantic City, N.J. last April, where a cargo container was packed with 5,000 rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

This frame grab from video, provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) shows a test at the FAAs technical center in Atlantic City, N.J. last April, where a cargo container was packed with 5,000 rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

The Federal Aviation Administration is warning fliers about the dangers e-cigarettes pose in luggage.

This warning comes after luggage at a Los Angeles airport caught on fire due to an e-cigarette in checked bags.

The FAA said lithium cells, used for the cigarettes, are to blame for the fire and it is advising passengers to store e-cigarettes in carry-on luggage.

The FAA said storing the devices in carry-ons would guarantee quicker detection of fires.

Some passengers at Jack Brooks Regional Airport said they usually bring e-cigarettes with them. “I was the only one on the flight smoking an e-cigarette that I saw.

The only one in the Cleveland airport when I left,” said flier Eric Jackson. Jackson said he’s not surprised about the FAA’s warning and thinks packing e-cigarettes in carry-ons is a wise decision. “It can be easily controlled and dealt with one at a time where you might not be able to deal with the battery going off and catching clothes on fire,” Jackson said.

The FAA allows passengers to bring lithium batteries onto airplanes if they are still in their devices but bans spare lithium batteries. Jackson believes while the FAA has not yet banned e-cigarettes, it’s only a matter of time. “I do think the FAA will ban the use of e-cigarettes period to take away the threat,” he said.