Photo courtesy of the National Park Service/Knoxville News Sentinel

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service/Knoxville News Sentinel

With Spring just around the corner, anglers are making the trek to the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee to enjoy cold water trout fishing. The are over 2100 miles of streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and other choice locations such as the Little Pigeon River, that runs through Gatlinburg along with the Nantahala River and crystal clear waters of Deep Creek, west of Bryson City, offer a gold mine for fly and spin reel fishing sportsmen.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park provides a diverse, year round experience for anglers with isolated head water trout streams to broad cool water small mouth bass streams. Fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is permitted daily, from 30 minutes prior to sunrise to 30 minutes after the sunsets.Daily catches limit anglers to no more than five brook, rainbow or brown trout, small mouth bass, or a combination of both. 20 rock bass may be caught in addition to the aforementioned daily limit. The national park honors fishing licenses from both Tennessee and North Carolina and a trout stamp is not required.

With Spring rains melting the Winter snow, the water temperature of the nearly all the steams is rising, nearGatlinburg, Tennessee, which is good for fish activity as colder water makes the fish a bit sluggish. With weekly stock activity in full swing, many steams are approaching their fish carrying capacity, which ensures excellent catch opportunities throughout the year. As river levels continue to drop, the prospect of flooding lurks with extended periods of rain.

With the change of time and extended sunlight, local anglers, spring breakers and tourists will be able to enjoy more time to catch the big one! Experienced and novice anglers should remember to respect all regulations and report violator.