Launched in 1953 with a sexy photo of the actress Marilyn Monroe on the cover, Playboy abandons the recipe that made ​​its success. The magazine will cease publication of photos of naked women from the month of March.

The magazine, however, continue to publish photos of women in provocative poses, but they will be more open, explained the director of the magazine, Scott Flanders, the New York Times.

“The political and sexual climate of 1953 … bears almost no resemblance to today,” said Playboy Enterprises CEO Scott Flanders. “We are more free to express ourselves politically, sexually and culturally today, and that’s in large part thanks to Hef’s heroic mission to expand those freedoms.”

The journal is looking for a new image to stand out pornographic sites that offer free, on the Internet, “every imaginable sexual acts,” said Flanders.

The decision to give a new direction to the publication was made following a meeting with the leadership of the founder of the magazine and editor in chief, Hugh Hefner.

Playboy, which sold 5.6 million copies in 1975 flows now only 800,000 copies.

The magazine, which was the first to break the taboo by publishing pictures of naked women account reorient its offer and be present on social media like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The magazine also began its turn, two months ago, eliminating total nudity on its website.