Bison Almost Fatally Charges at Yellowstone National Park By ceasol from Edmonton, Canada (Elk Island National Park) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Bison Almost Fatally Charges at Yellowstone National Park By ceasol from Edmonton, Canada (Elk Island National Park) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Bison Almost Fatally Charges at Yellowstone National Park
A bison that was out roaming at Yellowstone National Park violently charged toward a group of tourists, which included children, reports the Huffpost. The tourists attempted to get closer to touch the animal after hearing someone say that the animal is friendly. There is a video of the entire incident on the internet.

In the footage, the group stands in front of the bison while taking pictures. As they start moving closder, the bison charges and starts chasing after the group. One of the children barely escapes unharmed.

During the fall, bison feed in areas where tourists may walk up to them. They are instructed to stay at least 25 yards away from the bison. The bison are some of the largest animals in the world, and are capable of killing someone instantly. There are signs at Yellowstone National Park that warn tourists to stay away from the animals.

The West Yellowstone Chamber video on its Facebook page criticizing the the adults in the clip for their irresponsible behavior:

This video is one that makes us angry, expecially [sic] at the irresponsible person behind the camera urging the children “to go ahead and touch him.” This group has no idea how incredibly lucky they were that no one was injured or killed. Yellowstone is an incredible place that allows us all to experience wildlife in a way that can you can no where in the world. But, it is also a place where safety rules, regarding wildlife and thermal features, are so important to follow. As a leader or parent or guide, it is your responsiblity [sic] to take the time to understand and follow them, and provide the example for others.

According to NPS.Gov, there are between 2300 to 4500 bison in the park depending on time of year.

A bison can run more than 30 miles per hour.