Widely reported pit bull attacks have resulted in the enactment of breed-specific legislation in several jurisdictions, ranging from outright bans on the possession of pit bull-type dogs, to restrictions and conditions on pit bull ownership. Pit bulls have constituted approximately 2% of the dogs in the U.S., and a 9-year (1979–88) review of fatal dog attacks in the U.S. determined that pit bulls were implicated in 42% of the attacks in which breed was recorded. More recent data on Fatal dog attacks in the United States show that for the years from 2006 through 2012, pit bulls were responsible for 124 of the 217 fatal dog attacks, or approximately 57%. The frequency of fatal and injurious attacks on humans by pit bull dogs has also resulted in increased premiums for liability insurance.

Widely reported pit bull attacks have resulted in the enactment of breed-specific legislation in several jurisdictions, ranging from outright bans on the possession of pit bull-type dogs, to restrictions and conditions on pit bull ownership. Pit bulls have constituted approximately 2% of the dogs in the U.S., and a 9-year (1979–88) review of fatal dog attacks in the U.S. determined that pit bulls were implicated in 42% of the attacks in which breed was recorded. More recent data on Fatal dog attacks in the United States show that for the years from 2006 through 2012, pit bulls were responsible for 124 of the 217 fatal dog attacks, or approximately 57%. The frequency of fatal and injurious attacks on humans by pit bull dogs has also resulted in increased premiums for liability insurance.