"Everest North Face toward Base Camp Tibet Luca Galuzzi 2006" by I, Luca Galuzzi. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Everest_North_Face_toward_Base_Camp_Tibet_Luca_Galuzzi_2006.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Everest_North_Face_toward_Base_Camp_Tibet_Luca_Galuzzi_2006.jpg

“Everest North Face toward Base Camp Tibet Luca Galuzzi 2006” by I, Luca Galuzzi. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Everest_North_Face_toward_Base_Camp_Tibet_Luca_Galuzzi_2006.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Everest_North_Face_toward_Base_Camp_Tibet_Luca_Galuzzi_2006.jpg

Human Waste Left On Mount Everest Puts Others At The Risk For Disease

Mount Everest climbers are putting others at risk by leaving human waste. Human waste can lead to the spread of disease. Ash Teshering is the Chief Of The Mountaineering Association. He has stated that 700 guides and climbers spend about two months on the slopes of Mouth Everest during the climbing season. He has stated that the government in Nepal needs to address the issue of climbers living behind urine and feces.

Teshering says that people often build holes in the snow and eliminate their waste there. In many cases, the waste builds up for years. He says that there are toilet tents at the base camps, and people should start using them to get rid of their waste.

Dawn Steven Sherpa is one of the leaders of the Mount Everest expeditions. He says that some of the climbers will use toilet bags that can be used at higher elevation. He also agrees that climbers leaving behind human waste is a health problem that needs to be addressed by the Nepal government.

The Nepal government has not come up with a solution for this problem. However, Puspa Kaj Katuwal who is the head of the government’s mountaineering department, says that the officials at the base camp will start monitoring the garbage on the mountain starting this climbing season.

Last year, the government set rules saying that climbers must bring down 18 pounds of trash to the base camp. It is estimated that the average climber eliminates about 18 pound of waste during their route. Climbing teams who do not comply are required to leave a $4,000 deposit.

More than 4,000 climbers have scaled Mount Everest since 1953, when it was first conquered by New Zealand climber Edmund Hillary and his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay. Hundreds of others have died in the attempt, while many have succeeded only with help from oxygen tanks, equipment porters and Sherpa guides.

Source:

Mount Everest Human Waste
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/03/too-much-human-poo-on-mount-everest-says-nepal