AIRMAN 1ST CLASS VERONICA PIERCE/AIR FORCE Then Master Sgt. Mike Maroney gets a big hug from the little girl he rescued along with her family in Hurricane Katrina's aftermath. Ten years later, he hopes to find out whatever happened to her.

AIRMAN 1ST CLASS VERONICA PIERCE/AIR FORCE
Then Master Sgt. Mike Maroney gets a big hug from the little girl he rescued along with her family in Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath. Ten years later, he hopes to find out whatever happened to her.

 

10 Years Later, Katrina Rescurer Seeks Find Young Girl He Rescued

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina wreaked havoc on the city of New Orleans, bringing death, destruction and despair to millions of individuals. Stranded individuals were rescued from flood waters by many armed forces branches. One rescue was that of a young girl and her six relatives by Mike Maroney of the United States Air Force.

Maroney was so moved by the young girl’s fortitude and compassion, as she, herself comforted her emotionally distressed Mother, after the harrowing helicopter rescue. As they both were preparing to depart New Orleans International Airport, the young girl jumped onto Maroney, threw her arms around him and gave a big hug. It’s a moment that was photographed, and became an iconic image that would always be associated with Hurricane Katrina.

Fast forward 10 years to 2015, Mike Maroney is now an Air Force veteran and civilian para-rescue instructor at the United States Air Force, Joint San Antonio in Texas. Maroney is curious about how the young girl is faring along with her six relatives that were rescued. He is seeking the public’s assistance in locating her through various social media outlets. The Air Force has issued the hashtag #FindKatrinaKid in support of Mike Maroney’s efforts