Scientists have redated an ancient hunting site in southern Alberta that pushes back the date for the earliest culture in North American by centuries.

Scientists have redated an ancient hunting site in southern Alberta that pushes back the date for the earliest culture in North American by centuries.

Ancient site sheds light on first Albertans

The prehistoric site at Wally’s Beach, in southwestern Calgary, Alberta, has been confirmed to be a much older site than was originally thought. According to University of Calgary archeologist Brian Kooyman, technology has advanced enough to change the dating by hundreds of years. This discovery now makes this North America’s oldest identifiable culture.

This fascinating sight near the St. Mary’s river was discovered in 1999 by a teacher who was taking a walk with his family. The water at that time was very low. The dirt and sand around it had been blown away, thus exposing the ancient artifacts.

It is presumed this spot was a favorite watering hole for the animals, and the old Albertans used the opportunity to replenish their meat supplies. You can still see the footprints of the butchered horses and camels. Camels, it seems, were animals native to North America, but they disappeared at the end of the ice ages.

The site features evidence of seven horses and one camel as well as an assembly of various choppers and knives created from stone. The cut marks on the bones of the animals are still visible as proof of a successful hunt.