This screen grab from a video posted to Facebook in May shows a baby being held by its arms and dunked into a bucket of water. Facebook has bowed to pressure and taken down the video, which it said showed baby yoga. (Facebook)

This screen grab from a video posted to Facebook in May shows a baby being held by its arms and dunked into a bucket of water. Facebook has bowed to pressure and taken down the video, which it said showed baby yoga. (Facebook)

facebook baby yoga

Facebook is pulling down a video of a baby being swung around by the legs and repeatedly dunked into a tub of water, but only in instances where the practice is being encouraged.

According to media reports Friday, the so-called baby yoga video was posted to Facebook in late May and is thought to have originated in Indonesia.

The Guardian reports, the video prompted complaints from child welfare organizations around the world.

On Friday Facebook said it is removing the video in those cases where the post is encouraging the behaviour, and marking the video as disturbing in those cases where the post is condemning the practice.

In a statement, the company said it found the video “upsetting and disturbing.”

“In this case, we are removing any reported instances of the video from Facebook that are shared supporting or encouraging this behaviour,” said Facebook.

“In cases where people are raising awareness or condemning the practice, we are marking reported videos as disturbing, which means they have a warning screen and are accessible only to people over the age of 18,” the statement read.

The social networking site had initially refused to take down the video.

“We do not allow child abuse on Facebook, and any illegal content which is flagged to us is quickly removed,” a spokesperson for the social network said in a statement.

“Whilst we understand that people may be upset by this video which depicts a form of baby yoga, after careful review, we found it does not break our rules,” Facebook said in their initial statement.

In Britain, the National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) feels this incident is a wake-up call that Facebook needs to step up to the responsibility and make better ethical decisions.

“The NSPCC believes we have now reached the long overdue point where it is time for social networking sites to be held to account for the content on their sites,” Peter Wanless, chief executive of the NSPCC, wrote in a letter Britain’s internet safety minister Baroness Shields and minister for the digital economy Ed Vaizey.

Swung: Child abuse charities have condemned Facebook for refusing to remove the vide

Swung: Child abuse charities have condemned Facebook for refusing to remove the vide

below is a baby yoga video