bees bang heads at a rate of 350 times per second

Scientists have revealed a unique secret about Austrian bees

According to a new research, bees down under employ a very hardcore approach for pollination. The native blue-banded bee head bang flowers at very high speed, knocking of its head 350 times a second.

The heading banging of thier heads causes vibrations similar to the motion of salt and pepper shaker and helps dislodge and disperse polling grains, a process necessary for the reproduction of flowers.

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As reported by the Inquistr, most of the bees dislodge pollens in a very calm and conventional way. When American bumblebee lands on flower to collect nectar, it uses its wing muscle to shake and roll the pollen out of flower.

This is the first time researchers have observed and documented an alternate technique for pollination. They found that Australian bees not only head bang at a higher frequency then oversees bees but also spend relatively less time per flower.

Australian blue-banded bees bang their heads 350 times a second while getting the pollen out of a flower. This was caught on film for the first time by researchers.

Australian blue-banded bees bang their heads 350 times a second while getting the pollen out of a flower. This was caught on film for the first time by researchers.

“We were absolutely surprised. We were so buried in the scene of it, we never thought about something like this. This is something totally new.” Dr Katja Hogendoorn, a bee specialist from University of Adelaide said.

The discovery has opened a new door to better understand the muscle stress generated as a result of such headbanging and to improve the efficiency of the pollination of crops. Since certain crops depend on bees or other insects for pollination, it will help developing miniature flying robots. And it will also contribute in saving a lot of time.

“This new finding suggests that blue-banded bees could also be very efficient pollinators – needing fewer bees per hectare.” Hogendoorn said.

Below low-motion video shows the Aussie bee’s high-speed headbanging.