Whitesboro seal Called Out On The Daily Show

The Village of Whitesboro, N.Y. has succumbed to public pressure and announced that, despite a recent vote of support, it will do away with a town seal many view as racist and offensive.

At the end of a bit that ran on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah at 11 p.m. last night, January 22, it was announced that village officials with the descendants of Hugh White will be getting together with the Oneida Indian Nation to create a seal that everyone can agree on.

Whitesboro seal Called Out On The Daily Show

Whitesboro seal Called Out On The Daily Show

The voting of the towns seal was shown, along with interviews with the mayor, the village clerk, an American Indian activist, and local residents.

Patrick O’Connor admitted last week that Whitesboro used Comedy Central’s art department to create some of the seal options.

During the skit, Mayor O’Connor explain that village’s opinion on the seal: “The seal is absolutely not offensive. The seal depicts our founder – Hugh white. Hugh White is invited to engage to a friendly wrestling match. The goal of the match was to push the opponent off balance. The seal is based on historical events that fostered a good relationship between our founder and the American Indians.

In 1977 the seal was changed to move the hands away from the neck area down to the shoulders.

There has been no confirmation yet that the seal will be changed from Whitesboro officials.

“We will be following up with town officials later today; stay with WKTV for the latest updates.

Ray Halbritter, a representative of the Oneida Indian Nation, applauded Friday’s decision to create a new seal that will better reflect the community’s core values.

In this photo taken July 16, 2015, a welcome sign on the village green, Whitesboro, N.Y., displays the village seal. Whitesboro will let voters decide whether to keep the longtime village seal that has been called offensive to Native Americans. (Observer-Dispatch via AP) ROME OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

In this photo taken July 16, 2015, a welcome sign on the village green, Whitesboro, N.Y., displays the village seal. Whitesboro will let voters decide whether to keep the longtime village seal that has been called offensive to Native Americans. (Observer-Dispatch via AP) ROME OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

“We are happy to work with anyone who wants to make sure the symbols they are promoting are honoring and respecting all people,” he said in a statement. “This is but one of many important examples of communities taking welcome steps to be inclusive and promote our region’s commitment to civility.”

Attempts to reach Whitesboro officials for comment Friday were unsuccessful.