Dead woman Capuchin monkeys

According to media reports Sunday, a woman was found dead in a motel room in Florida, along with a note and two live monkeys, police said.

Fox Orlando reports, authorities discovered the Capuchin monkeys in crates, the North Port police said in a statement.

Investigation continues into suspicious death at Budget Inn. One death, one person being questioned. Two monkeys being removed from room by FWC. Monkeys were in cages in the room.

Investigation continues into suspicious death at Budget Inn. One death, one person being questioned. Two monkeys being removed from room by FWC. Monkeys were in cages in the room.

Police identified the woman as Linda Marie Smith, 59, of Arcadia, Florida. She was found Friday at a Budget Inn in North Port.

On Their Facebook page, police added:

The scene at the Budget Inn has been released. The preliminary investigation has revealed the deceased woman found is Linda Marie Smith (3/17/56) of Arcadia. The other male subject found in the room was incoherent and received medical attention. He is being questioned for his involvement. His name is not being released at this time.

“There was no obvious signs of trauma to Smith’s body,” police said. “The cause of death is undetermined at this point. The medical examiner will soon conduct an autopsy.”

An incoherent man, who was in the room with her, received medical attention and was undergoing questioning.

The two monkeys found in cages in the room have been taken by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission in good health.

Dead woman Capuchin monkeys 2 The two monkeys found in cages in the room have been taken by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission in good health.

Police did not release his identity or what the note said.

The man is being questioned while Florida Fish & Wildlife agents have taken the monkeys into their care.

The capuchin monkeys (/ˈkæpjʊtʃɪn/ or /ˈkæpjʊʃɪn/) are New World monkeys of the subfamily Cebinae. Prior to 2011, the subfamily contained only a single genus, Cebus. However, in 2011, it was proposed that the capuchin monkeys should be split between the gracile capuchins in the genus Cebus and the robust capuchins in the genus Sapajus. The range of capuchin monkeys includes Central America and South America as far south as northern Argentina.

The capuchin monkeys (/ˈkæpjʊtʃɪn/ or /ˈkæpjʊʃɪn/) are New World monkeys of the subfamily Cebinae. Prior to 2011, the subfamily contained only a single genus, Cebus. However, in 2011, it was proposed that the capuchin monkeys should be split between the gracile capuchins in the genus Cebus and the robust capuchins in the genus Sapajus. The range of capuchin monkeys includes Central America and South America as far south as northern Argentina.

According to Monkey World, Capuchins are considered the most intelligent New World monkeys and are often used in laboratories. The tufted capuchin is especially noted for its long-term tool usage,one of the few examples of primate tool use other than by apes. Upon seeing macaws eating palm nuts, cracking them open with their beaks, these capuchins will select a few of the ripest fruits, nip off the tip of the fruit and drink down the juice, then seemingly discard the rest of the fruit with the nut inside. When these discarded fruits have hardened and become slightly brittle, the capuchins will gather them up again and take them to a large flat boulder where they have previously gathered a few river stones from up to a mile away. They will then use these stones, some of them weighing as much as the monkeys, to crack open the fruit to get to the nut inside. Young capuchins will watch this process to learn from the older, more experienced adults but it takes them 8 years to master this.