Australia crocodile attack: MP calls Victim "Stupid"

Australia crocodile attack: MP calls Victim “Stupid”

CAIRNS, Australia, (dBTechno) – According to media reports Tuesday, a crocodile in Australia snatched a woman taking a late-night swim in a national park and is believed to have killed her.

As reported by The Globe, The 46-year-old woman was swimming with a friend late on Sunday in waist-deep water at a beach in Queensland state when she disappeared, police said.

“They felt a nudge, and a large crocodile is alleged to have grabbed one of the ladies and pulled her into the water,” Neil Noble, a supervisor for the Queensland state ambulance service, told reporters.

Police did not identify the woman or give her nationality but said she lives in Australia and has family in New Zealand.

North Queensland member for parliament, Warren Entsch, who represents the region, said the victim should be blamed for the attack, not the crocodile.

Australia crocodile attack: MP calls Victim "Stupid"

Australia crocodile attack: MP calls Victim “Stupid”

“You can’t legislate against human stupidity,” Entsch said on Monday, noting that Thornton Beach lies next to a creek where tourism operators run crocodile-spotting tours.

“This is a tragedy but it was avoidable. You can only get there by ferry, and there are signs there saying watch out for the bloody crocodiles,” he added.

“If you go in swimming at 10 o’clock at night, you’re going to get consumed.”

senior operations supervisor with Queensland Ambulance Service, Neil Noble, said emergency services had been called immediately after the attack but were still trying to find the victim.

“We were called down to Thornton beach late last evening for reports of a female that was walking in the water with another lady and it has been alleged that a crocodile has come and grabbed one of the ladies and pulled her into the ocean,” he said.

A spokeswoman for the Queensland department of environment and heritage protection told Guardian Australia it was “planning detailed population surveys of crocodile numbers in consultation with recognised crocodile experts”.

The results would “provide scientifically sound information about crocodile populations to guide future management of crocodiles throughout their range in Queensland”, she said.

Seven people have been killed in 24 known crocodile attacks in Queensland since 1985, according to departmental records.