In 2012, Voskerician declared his intention to turn one of the houses surrounding the Facebook CEO's California home into massive estate He told Zuckerberg it would have 'a direct view into his master bedroom' and so the Facebook CEO bought rights to the property for $1.7million In return for sale, developer says he was promised Silicon Valley contacts which Zuckerberg denies

In 2012, Voskerician declared his intention to turn one of the houses surrounding the Facebook CEO’s California home into massive estate
He told Zuckerberg it would have ‘a direct view into his master bedroom’ and so the Facebook CEO bought rights to the property for $1.7million
In return for sale, developer says he was promised Silicon Valley contacts which Zuckerberg denies

A California judge has refused to dismiss fraud charges against Mark Zuckerberg brought on by his backdoor neighbor, who sold the Facebook CEO part of his huge estate.
Real estate developer Mircea Voskerician has claimed Zuckerberg promised him entree into the Silicon Valley elite in exchange for the house in Palo Alto, California, which the developer then sold the rights to at a ‘discount rate’ in 2012.

According to teh Daily Mail, Voskerician claims Zuckerberg didn’t follow through on the promise, the real estate developer’s attorney David Draper has appealed to the court to withdraw from the case, citing that his participation could present ethical dilemmas.

Voskerician is suing the 30-year-old billionaire, who lives in his adjacent mansion with his wife, Priscilla Chan, based on allegations including fraud and misrepresentation. Zuckerberg has denied the claims.

CNN writes:

In the latest turn in this crazy story, a jury will now have to decide if the Facebook CEO perpetrated fraud. Real estate developer, Mircea Voskerician, claims that Zuckerberg promised to introduce him to his high-powered friends in Silicon Valley — which he apparently didn’t follow through on.

Adding:

And in yet another twist, Voskerician’s attorney David Draper also appealed the court to withdraw from the case. Draper cited two rules that state his participation could present ethical dilemmas.

In addition to claims of fraud and misrepresentation, the lawsuit also accuses Zuckerberg of breach of contract. Voskerician’s and Zuckerberg’s lawyers declined to comment.

Next-door neighbors: In November 2012, Voskerician reportedly sent Zuckerberg a letter saying he planned to tear down the property behind his home and replace it with a 9,600sq-ft mansion. Above, the two properties

Next-door neighbors: In November 2012, Voskerician reportedly sent Zuckerberg a letter saying he planned to tear down the property behind his home and replace it with a 9,600sq-ft mansion. Above, the two properties