Curiosity finds a Martian “Flower”

Curiosity, the Mars land rover has discovered a “flower” embedded in a rock on planet Mars, according to “the internet.”

Internet users of a forum called “Above Top Secret” began calling the formation on the snake shaped rock a flower because it looked like a flower in the photo sent back by Curiosity on December 19th.

Forum user Arken wrote:

“This amazing, extremely unusually-looking translucent object on the Martian surface is the second one detected by the Rover Curiosity. […] The Albedo (or Reflectivity of Sun Light) of this object is very high, and its translucent appearance, the irregular conformation (like [the pistils of a flower]) and the “texture” of its wider areas is smooth, and seem that it is ground attached.”

Another user, Sublimecraft, took a more logical approach when trying to determine what the photo was of:

Sublimecraft wrote:

My immediate thoughts were that it looks remarkably similar to polystyrene packing foam.

But it’s probably just………

1. A glitch
2. Part of the rover.
3. Something that fell out of the guinea pig.
4. Something from the studio.
5. Part of a weather balloon.
6. Swamp gas.
7. Optical illusion.
8. Reflection of Venus.
9. Part of a Chinese lantern.
10. Pareidolia.

ANYTHING except what it looks like………..Martian polystyrene.

The transparent “flower” was first thought to be a piece of plastic from Curiosity’s robotic arm but scientists have ruled that out deciding that it is protruding from the rock.

JPL spokesman Guy Webster told NBCNews.com that the object “appears to be part of the rock, not debris from the spacecraft.”

According to Space.Com, the rock itself named “snake rock” because of winding along above the flat rocks of the area is part of the land rover’s area of study as it makes its way to a mountain peak.

Scientists have named this mountain Mount Sharp. They are choosing a point close by for Curiosity to begin drilling to test for proof of previous proof of primitive microbial life.

What do you think? Did Curiosity Find A Flower on Mars?