new army camouflage

new army camouflage

Washington, D.C. – For the time being, the United States Air Force will not be adopting the Army’s new camouflage patterned officially called the “Operational Camouflage Patter” or OCP. The US Army unveiled the new digitally pixilated pattern over the summer and plans to have it available for purchase by servicemen starting next year. Ten years ago, the Army changed its battle fatigues to use what was then known as the Universal Camouflage Pattern. It was designed by a civilian defense contractor to be better suited to the Afghanistan theater of combat. At the time, the US Air Force was swift to follow the Army’s lead and adopt a new and improved camouflage.

However, a lot has changed since then. For starters, major combat operations are Iraq and Afghanistan are largely over. Also, the US Congress, which to date has never cut the budget of any government bureaucracy other than the military budget, passed the 2014 National Defense Authorization Act. The new law for the upcoming fiscal year requires all branches of service move to adopt one joint combat uniform. It had been discovered that each branch of service was using taxpayer funds to uniquely repaint field equipment to identify the branch by camouflage paint. This was deemed wasteful given that the objective on the battlefield is to shield soldiers and equipment from detection by the enemy. Moving to a single pattern will potentially save billions.

That said, each branch of service may still use distinct camouflage patterns, but those patterns will be created to adapt to the field requirements of unique combat theaters. Distinct camouflage patterns for a desert or woodland region will be used by all branches of service in those areas. While the Air Force will still require their soldiers wear the existing uniforms while at garrison, those who serve jointly with the Army will use the OCP during those operations.

Reference:
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2014/09/03/air-force-says-no-to-new-camouflage.html