Jersey Devil sighting

Jersey Devil sighting

Jersey Devil sighting

The New The New Jersey Devil ranks right up there with Bigfoot and the chupacabra as one of America’s most famous cryptids.

According to PIx11, details of the New Jersey Devil date back to the 1700’s. Jersey residents continue to spread tales about the mythical monster and claim to have spotted it, but there has been no real proof of it existing.

Most accounts suggest that the creature has a horse-like face with antlers or horns sprouting from the top of its head. It walks on two legs, ending with cloven hooves or pig’s feet. The overall body shape resembles a kangaroo, though it also has wings like a bat. Some say it has a tail like a lizard; others say it has no tail at all. The monster is said to kill dogs, chickens and other small animals, as well as leave spooky cloven hoof prints in snow, and bellow a terrifying screech in the wooded darkness.

Now with new poorly taken grainy footage, we have new and possibly definitive proof of the Jersey Devil’s existence, at least according to one resident of the state.

NJ residents said they have spotted the Jersey Devil in the state before (Weird NJ/Wikipedia)

NJ residents said they have spotted the Jersey Devil in the state before (Weird NJ/Wikipedia)

Dave Black, of Little Egg Harbor township, wrote into NJ.com with his Tuesday night account of the sighting:

“I was just driving past the golf course in Galloway on Route 9 and had to shake my head a few times when I thought I saw a llama,” he explained in an email.

Sightings are rare. Several people have claimed to have seen or encountered the Jersey Devil over the past 250 years. In a section on the topic in the encyclopedia “American Folklore,” folklorist Angus Kress Gillespie notes that “The Jersey Devil remained an obscure regional legend through most of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, until 1909 when a series of purported ‘Devil’ sightings inspired a Philadelphia businessman to stage a hoax. He painted a kangaroo green, attached fake wings to the helpless creature, and had it exhibited to the public.” The 1909 hoax (and others like it) inspired further sightings and reports, which continue to this day.